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3 edition of A rule of good life: written by the mellifluous doctor S. Bernard (monke and abbot of the holie order of S. Benet) especiallie for virgins, and other religious woemen; and may profitably be read likewise by all others, that aspire to Christian perfection. Faithfully translated into English by the R. Father Antonie Batt, monke of the holie order afore-said, of the Congregation of England found in the catalog.

A rule of good life: written by the mellifluous doctor S. Bernard (monke and abbot of the holie order of S. Benet) especiallie for virgins, and other religious woemen; and may profitably be read likewise by all others, that aspire to Christian perfection. Faithfully translated into English by the R. Father Antonie Batt, monke of the holie order afore-said, of the Congregation of England

Bernard of Clairvaux, Saint

A rule of good life: written by the mellifluous doctor S. Bernard (monke and abbot of the holie order of S. Benet) especiallie for virgins, and other religious woemen; and may profitably be read likewise by all others, that aspire to Christian perfection. Faithfully translated into English by the R. Father Antonie Batt, monke of the holie order afore-said, of the Congregation of England

by Bernard of Clairvaux, Saint

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  • 12 Currently reading

Published by By Lavrence Kellam in Printed at Doway .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Christian life -- Catholic authors -- Early works to 1800.

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesModus bene vivendi.
    GenreEarly works to 1800.
    SeriesEarly English books, 1475-1640 -- 1057:18.
    ContributionsBatt, Antonie.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination[20], 483 [i.e. 479], [1] p.
    Number of Pages483
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18859438M

    The lives of S. Jerome, S. Macarius, S. Anthony, and S. Mary of Egypt, and other saints of the desert, read like the echoes of another world, so far removed are they from modern habits of thought, faith, and practice; while those of S. Francis, S. Dominic, and S. Thomas of Canterbury bring before our eyes the life of the middle ages hardly less. Bernard, one of the dominant figures of the twelfth century, was born in Burgundy in At the age of twenty-two he entered the monastery of Citeaux, which had been founded by a group of monks intent on adhering to the letter of the Rule of St. Benedict. Bernard, a nobleman, turned away from worldly possibilities of power and pleasure.

    - Explore crc4xpi's board "Early Monasticism", followed by people on Pinterest. See more ideas about Catholic saints, Catholic and Bernard of clairvaux pins. Posts about Rule of St. Benedict written by robalspaugh. For my introduction to this little project, see here.. Next post in the series here.. The interesting thing about these opening lines, other than the statement of the two questions in #5, is the way in which Ratramnus frames his entire project.

    The volume starts off with a transcript of Bernard’s sermon “On Conversion” delivered in Paris sometime during the year A.D. [3] Written – and most likely delivered – with a pastoral heart, Bernard tries hard to convince people that following God is a noble and worthy cause worth forsaking worldly fame and success. After walking. – from a sermon by Saint Bernard. All those things that the world loves, such as pleasure, honors, praise, and riches, are to me crosses; and all things which the world counts as crosses, I seek and embrace with the greatest affection. – Saint Bernard. Look at that clever calumniator!


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A rule of good life: written by the mellifluous doctor S. Bernard (monke and abbot of the holie order of S. Benet) especiallie for virgins, and other religious woemen; and may profitably be read likewise by all others, that aspire to Christian perfection. Faithfully translated into English by the R. Father Antonie Batt, monke of the holie order afore-said, of the Congregation of England by Bernard of Clairvaux, Saint Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. A rule of good life: written by the mellifluous doctor S. Bernard (monke and abbot of the holie order of S. Benet) especiallie for virgins, and other religious woemen; and may profitably be read likewise by all others, that aspire to Christian perfection.

Faithfully translated into English by the R. Father Antonie Batt, monke of the holie order afore-said, of the. BATT, ANTHONY (d. ), was a Benedictine monk, who resided for some years in the English monastery of his order at Dieulwart, in Lorraine.

Weldon (Chronological Notes) says his death occurred 12 Jan.and adds that ‘he was a great promoter and practiser of regular discipline, a famous translator of many pious books into wrote a most curious hand, and spent much of. Anthony Batt (died ), was a Benedictine monk.

Batt resided for some years in the English monastery of his order at Dieulwart, in says that his death occurred 12 Jan.and adds that ‘he was a great promoter and practiser of regular discipline, a famous translator of.

A rule of good life: written by the mellifluous doctor S. Bernard (monke and abbot of the holie order of A rule of good life: written by the mellifluous doctor S.

Bernard (monke and abbot of the holie order of A hymn of St. Bernard's to the holy Jesus [electronic resource]. Read more about the life of St. Bernard. This site — complete with words and midi files — features hymns written by St. Bernard. Learn more. While an account of the life of “the Mellifluous Doctor” of the Church, St.

Bernard of Clairvaux ( – ) and the great influence he had at his time and beyond, this biography exemplifies the heights of sanctity lived out in religious life. Bernard founded numerous Cistercian monasteries. A Rule of Good Life: Written by the mellifluous Doctor S.

Bernard (Monke and Abbot of the holie Order of S. Benet) Faithfully translated into English by the R. Father Antonie Batt, Monke of. Bernard's Sister Enters the Religious Life St.

Bernard's father went into the monastery and dwelled there a certain time, and after died in good age. The sister was married in to the world, and on a time she arrayed and apparelled her in riches and delights of the world, and went into the monastery for to visit her brethren in a proud.

Early life (–) Bernard's parents were Tescelin de Fontaine, lord of Fontaine-lès-Dijon, and Alèthe de Montbard [], both members of the highest nobility of d was the third of seven children, six of whom were sons.

At the age of nine, he was sent to a school at Châtillon-sur-Seine run by the secular canons of Saint-Vorles. Bernard had a great taste for literature.

On Loving God. By: St. Bernard of Clairvaux: The Mellifluous Doctor; By: Thomas Merton Convictions St. Benedict about monastic life are contained in the most influential guide for monastic life ever written, The Holy Rule of St. Benedict. It is written for laymen, and emphasizes the value of work, community, simplicity, obedience.

One of 36 doctors of the Catholic Church, Bernard is known as the “Mellifluous Doctor” for his prose. His prose is beautiful because it is so replete with scriptural imagery.

Even the most biblically literate readers will have a hard time knowing where Bernard ends and the Bible begins—even though some Protestants may wince at Bernard’s. Bernard of Clairvaux: The Mellifluous Doctor; By: Thomas Merton Convictions St.

Benedict about monastic life are contained in the most influential guide for monastic life ever written, The Holy Rule of St. Benedict. It is written for laymen, and emphasizes the value of work, community, simplicity, obedience, moderation and prayer. As studied by James France in his book, Medieval Images of Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, the first comprehensive study of this subject, Bernard’s life and the legends that grew up about him gave rise to many iconographical types during the medieval period, which he ends at about 2 Among them are: • Bernard as monk and abbot.

But Bernard's dedication to the strict observance of Benedict's rule was mingled not with the abrasive, shrill style of the prophet but with a sweetness and purity of vision that earned him the title Doctor mellifluous.

For he possessed a sense of the love of God, the importance of humility, and the sheer beauty of holiness that has made his 5/5(1). by the tireless St. Bernard, known as the Mellifluous Doctor.

The nonlinear, S-shaped time path of the initial spread of Cistercian rule resembles the diffusion patterns we will observe for technologies. The patterns of temporal diffusion do not vary across centuries, cultures, and.

Bernard writes even more emphatically: "I have said that wisdom is to be found in meditating on these truths [Christ's life, death, and resurrection].

For me they are the source of perfect righteousness, of the fullness of knowledge, of the most efficacious graces, of abundant merits.

Bernard's zeal and charisma led to the reform of Christian life in medieval Europe. Today it is reported that Pope Benedict XVI keeps Bernard's treatise Advice to a Pope close at hand for spiritual support. Honey and Salt is an original selection for the general reader of Bernard’s sermons, treatises, and s: This too, like all good things, is the Lord's doing, that we should love Him, for He hath endowed us with the possibility of love.

(Chapter 8) The Second and Third Degrees of Love - Let frequent troubles drive us to frequent supplications; and surely, tasting, we must see how gracious the Lord is (Ps. ).4/5(15). The Latin word mellifluous, flowing with honey, appears three times in the 1C: in this paragraph, in referring to Francis’s words at Greccio (n.

86) and in those of Pope Gregory IX at Francis’s canonization (n. It is used frequently in Cistercian literature, especially by Bernard of Clairvaux, the "Mellifluous.

Bernard of Clairvaux (Latin: Bernardus Claraevallensis; – 20 August ) was a French abbot and a major leader in the revitalization of Benedictine monasticism through the nascent Order of Cistercians. " He was sent to found a new abbey at an isolated clearing in a glen known as the Val d'Absinthe, about 15 kilometres ( mi) southeast of Bar-sur-Aube.

Early life (–) Bernard's parents were Tescelin, Lord of Fontaines, and Aleth of Montbard, both belonging to the highest nobility of d was the third of a family of seven children, six of whom were sons.

At the age of nine years, he was sent to school at Châtillon-sur-Seine, run by the secular canons of Saint-Vorles. Bernard had a great taste for literature and devoted.Bernard of Clairvaux – An th anniversary tribute written by Bernard of Cluny, a contemporary of Peter and Bernard of Clairvaux.

Not surprisingly, Bernard was known as ‘doctor mellifluous’, the ‘honey-flowing doctor’. Here is one of the quotations used by Calvin from Bernard’s famous sermons on .In his most resonant and mellifluous tones, he said, "You do me honour—" and took the offered hand, and lifted it grandly, when the Home Rule Bill received the Royal Assent.

On the 15th Mr. Asquith put forward his defence in the House of Commons. as written and spoken by him, full of harmony—rich, mellifluous, and sonorous. Gascon.